Breast Cancer In The Twentyfirst Century

Michael Lerner, The Age of Extinction and the Emerging Environmental Health Movement (n.d. accessed November 11, 2006 ), http www.commonweal.org 2. Quoted in International Summit on Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Needs (conference held in Santa Cruz, Calif., May 22-25, 2002), http cfch .pdf, 32. 3. The BCCPTA provided states with the option of using enhanced federal matching funds to extend Medicaid eligibility to women diagnosed with breast or cervical cancer through publicly...

Cancer Prevention and Environmental Risk

To get rid of slavery, abolitionists not only changed their consumer and lifestyle habits by choosing not to buy slaves themselves but they also organized underground railroads, demanded legislative change, and, finally, took up arms. In short, they got political and insisted on changing the system. . . . The abolitionists did not settle for reforming slavery, regulating slavery emission rates, conducting cost-benefit risk analyses on slave holding, or attaining state-of-the-art slavery. . . ....

Acronyms

ACT UP AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power AMA American Medical Association ASCC American Society for the Control of Cancer BCCCP Breast and Cervical Cancer Control Program BCCPTA Breast and Cervical Cancer Prevention and Treatment Act BCDA Breast Cancer Detection Awareness project BCDDP Breast Cancer Detection Demonstration Project BCEDP Breast Cancer Early Detection Program BCERC Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Centers BCPT Breast Cancer Prevention Trial BCRP California Breast Cancer...

Early Detection And Screening Activism

Lisa Belkin, How Breast Cancer Became This Year's Hottest Charity, New York Times Magazine, December 22, 1996, 40 57, quotation on 45. 2. For a thorough and thoughtful examination of corporate cause-related marketing and the breast cancer movement, see Samantha King, Pink Ribbons, Inc. Breast Cancer Culture and the Politics of Philanthropy (Minneapolis University of Minnesota Press, 2006). 3. Wolfson, The Fight against Big Tobacco. For further development of the concept of interpenetration, see...

Social Movements Without The Sovereign

Age-adjusted death rates going back to 1900 are available from the National Center for Health Statistics DataWarehouse, http www.cdc.gov nchs datawh statab unpubd mortabs hist293.htm. 2. Unless otherwise noted, the source for all facts and figures in this chapter's discussion is Breast Cancer Facts and Figures, 2005 2006. 3. All incidence and mortality rates cited in this book are age-adjusted unless otherwise noted. Between 1971 and 1993 the incidence of all cancer (excluding skin cancer)...

Iciety Fdr Control Of Cancer

Delay reduces the chance for recovery. Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, WPA Poster Collection, reproduction number LC-USZC2-1120. and bladder. Breast cancer treated early, according to this poster, led to a 70 percent cure rate, whereas breast cancer treated late resulted in a cure rate of only 10 percent. Other posters proclaimed don't fear cancer fight it and Don't Fight Cancer Alone. Another series of posters promoted surgery, radium, and x-rays as the treatments offered...

Patient Empowerment And Feminist Treatment Activism

In 1988 Winnow found another lump in the same breast where her cancer had been diagnosed three years earlier. Further tests revealed that her breast cancer had metastasized to her lungs and bones. She underwent an oophorectomy (removal of the ovaries) and in the summer of 1989 began radiation and chemotherapy to slow the spread of her cancer. She died on September 7,1991. See Sandy Polishuk, Jackie Winnow and the Women's Cancer Resource Center (an Interview), Bridges A Journal for Jewish...

Biomedicalization and the Anatomo Politics of Treatment

Why did the identity of being a woman with breast cancer change from passivity to action . . . What impelled women with breast cancer to break out of their isolation and assemble under the banner of a new social movement patricia a. kaufert, Women, Resistance, and the Breast Cancer Movement The biopolitics of screening, as we saw in chapter 3, changed the popular discourses and public administration of breast cancer. As it did so, it reconstituted ordinary women as risky subjects and...

Introduction

The phrase kingdom of the ill appears in Susan Sontag, Illness as Metaphor (New York Vintage Books, 1979), 3. 2. Letters to the Editor, New York Times Magazine, September 5,1993 Matuschka, Why I Did It, Glamour Magazine, November 1993, 162-63. 3. Susan Ferraro, 'You Can't Look Away Anymore' The Anguished Politics of Breast Cancer, New York Times Magazine, August 15, 1993, 25 27, 58 60. 4. Michael T. Heaney, Influential Groups in Health Policy Based on Interviews with Congressional Staffers,...

Biomedicalization And The Anatomopolitics Of Treatment

Novack et al., Changes in Physicians' Attitudes toward Telling the Cancer Patient, Journal of the American Medical Association 241 (March 2,1979) 897 900. 2. Oken, What to Tell Cancer Patients Mary-Jo Del Vecchio Good et al., American Oncology and the Discourse on Hope, Culture, Medicine, and Psychiatry 14 (1990) 1120-28. 3. Rose Kushner, Breast Cancer A Personal History and an Investigative Report (New York Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1975), 9. George Crile Jr., What Women Should Know...

Biomedicalization And The Biopolitics Of Screening

As previously noted, the concept of biomedicalization is elaborated in Clarke et al., Biomedicalization. 2. Throughout this chapter I use the locution healthy women to refer to women who are asymptomatic, appear to be cancer-free, and have never been diagnosed or treated for breast cancer. This has the unfortunate consequence of implying that women who are symptomatic, who show evidence of cancer, or who have been diagnosed or treated for breast cancer are unhealthy, and vice versa, that women...

Roni Peskin Mentzer

First and foremost, I want to thank the remarkable activists, educators, volunteers, staff members, and support group leaders whom I met, interviewed, and came to know during the course of this research, as well as the thousands of unknown, unnamed women and men who attended the numerous meetings, conferences, rallies, protests, readings, teach-ins, and other public events that make up a social movement. They are the subjects, sources, and inspiration for this book. I thank the following...

The Regime Of Medicalization

Yalom, A History of the Breast, 206. 2. The Federal Food and Drugs Act of 1906, known as the Pure Food and Drugs Act, was the first of several federal initiatives designed to regulate the content, labeling, sale, and safety (but not yet the effectiveness) of pharmaceutical drugs during the first few decades of the twentieth century. 3. Daniel De Moulin, A Short History of Breast Cancer (Boston Martinus Nijhoff, 1983), 2. 12. Frances Burney, A Mastectomy, in Medicine and Western Civilization,...