Dental Surgery Educational Dvds

Dental Seminars

This informational set of DVDs is the best practical way for you to learn how to be increase your dental practice offerings and thus increase your business in general! These DVDs are done by profession, top dentists to give you the high-quality dental education that you need year after year. Why would you settle for less than the very best that the dental industry has to offer? You can learn everything that you need to in order for this series of dental videos to have the fullest impact. These course DVDs cover topics like Extraction with Socket Coverage, Root Coverage with Tunnel Technique, and Maxillary Labial Frenectomy. Everything that you need to know is covered in this complete guide! You will be able to get the great-quality dental education that you need, on topics that are normally hard to teach!

Discover Dental Surgery Summary

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Antibiotic Protection for Dental Surgery

SOME TYPES OF HEART CONDItions put people at a higher risk to develop infectious endocarditis, or an infection of the heart that can damage heart valves. To protect these patients, cardiologists often recommend antibiotic protection before undergoing surgery, including dental surgery. Your dentist or dental surgeon, in addition to any other doctors, should be made aware if you have one of these conditions before you undergo surgery.

Impact Of Trials On Dental Practice

Fluoride supplements in the form of tablets to drops have long been considered an alternative to water fluoridation. Although the effectiveness of fluoride supplements was endorsed by many small clinical studies, closer examination of the experimental conditions of these, their methods and the analysis of their results undermined confidence in their findings. More modern, well-conducted clinical trials of supplements suggest that today, in children also exposed to fluoride from other sources such as toothpaste, the marginal effect of fluoride supplements is very small and there is substantial risk of fluorosis if supplements are used by young children.71 This has resulted in changes to recommended fluoride dosage schedules and deferment of the age commencing the use of supplements, implemented in many countries. Overall, poor compliance and potential risks of fluorosis make fluoride supplements a poor public health measure and they are infrequently prescribed in dental practice.72...

Universal infection control

In the light of the multiple routes of transmission noted above, the key principles that underpin modern infection control procedures are shown in Table 7.2. These apply in all healthcare settings, including dental surgery. The cleaning of used surgical instruments to remove visible deposits is an essential step prior to their sterilisation. In hospitals, both the cleaning and the subsequent sterilisation procedures are usually performed in a Central Sterile Supply Unit (CSSU). However, increasing amounts of minor surgery are performed in primary care and, under these circumstances, the decontamination of used instruments might be performed in a medical or dental practice. In such cases, instrument cleaning may be achieved by hand scrubbing in soap or detergent, but ultrasonic baths and washer disinfectors are very useful and more effective for many items. Heavy-duty protective gloves should be worn during instrument cleaning, and care taken to avoid sharps injuries.

Surgery Of The Nose And Nasal Septum

Figure 24-16 The technique for the extraoral block of the mandibular nerve is essentially the same as that for the maxillary block, except that the needle is directed upward and posteriorly, so that the mandibular nerve is contacted as it exits the foramen ovale. (Redrawn from Bononi SR The trigeminal nerve. In Bennett CR ed Monheim's Local Anesthesia and Pain Control in Dental Practice, 7th ed. St. Louis, CVMosby, 1984.)

Professional Degrees and Titles

Bachelor of Science in Nursing BA Bachelor of Arts BB(ASCP) Technologist in Blood Banking BDentSci, BDSc Bachelor of Dental Science BDS Bachelor of Dental Surgery BHS Bachelor of Health Science BHyg Bachelor of Hygiene D.D.S. Doctor of Dental Surgery Doctor of Dental Surgery FDS Fellow in Dental Surgery ChB, MBChB, BM ChB) Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery Master of Surgery (also ChM, CM, MS) Member of the College of Physicians and Surgeons Doctor of Medicine (also DrMed) Master of Dental Science (also MScD) Master of Dental Surgery Doctor of Medical Science Medical Laboratory Technician Medical Laboratory Technician Master of Nursing (also MScN or MSN) Medical Technologist in Molecular Pathology Master of Pharmacy (also MPharm) Master of Pharmacy (also MPharm) Master of Radiology Medical Records Librarian Master of Surgery (also ChM, CM, MC) Master of Science

Ophthalmic Nerve And Orbit Anatomy

Superior Oblique Muscle Too Tight Defect

Figure 20-11 The nerve of the right lateral nasal wall. Note the site and distribution of the sphenopalatine ganglion.(Redrawn from Bononi SR The trigeminal nerve. In Bennett CR Manheim's Local Anesthesia and Pain Control in Dental Practice, 7th ed. St. Louis, CVMosby, 1984. From Raj PP Clinical Practice of Regional Anesthesia. New York, Churchill Livingstone, 1991, p 207.) Figure 20-11 The nerve of the right lateral nasal wall. Note the site and distribution of the sphenopalatine ganglion.(Redrawn from Bononi SR The trigeminal nerve. In Bennett CR Manheim's Local Anesthesia and Pain Control in Dental Practice, 7th ed. St. Louis, CVMosby, 1984. From Raj PP Clinical Practice of Regional Anesthesia. New York, Churchill Livingstone, 1991, p 207.)

Surgery On The Middle Third Of The Face

Extraoral Infraorbital Block

Figure 24-15 Extraoral posterior approach for nerve block of the maxillary division of the trigeminal nerve. (Redrawn from Bononi SR The trigeminal nerve. In Bennett CR ed Monheim's Local Anesthesia and Pain Control in Dental Practice, 7th ed. St. Louis, CV Mosby, 1984.) Figure 24-15 Extraoral posterior approach for nerve block of the maxillary division of the trigeminal nerve. (Redrawn from Bononi SR The trigeminal nerve. In Bennett CR ed Monheim's Local Anesthesia and Pain Control in Dental Practice, 7th ed. St. Louis, CV Mosby, 1984.)

Indications for the use of sedative drugs Premedication

'Sedo-analgesiaThis term describes the use of a combination of a sedative drug with local anaesthesia, e.g. in dental surgery or surgical procedures performed under regional blockade. The recent expansion in the development of minimally invasive sur gery makes this technique more widely applicable.

Monitoring Of Respiratory Function

Elderly patients may have an associated decrease in cardiovascular and respiratory reserve. Procedures that make use of local anesthetics such as ophthalmic surgery and concomitant use of sedative drugs can increase the risk of respiratory depression. The frequent irrigation of the mouth during oral and dental surgery can cause hypoventilation and hypoxemia even without sedation.

Unit 9 Pulp Cavities

Not all can be seen by observing the surface is a statement that is sometimes equated to icebergs, but is likewise applicable to teeth, since only their surface features are evident to clinical inspection. A large segment of dental practice, namely endodontia. is directly concerned with the hidden portion of a tooth. The name, endodontia, implies inside a tooth , thereby involving the treatment of the pulp cavity and its tissues.

Patient Selection

The selection of patients presenting for dental chair anaesthesia should be the same as for patients undergoing any outpatient procedure, i.e. only healthy ASA grade I and II patients are appropriate. The preoperative screening of patients may be particularly difficult in a dental practice, but this is the situation in which careful selection of patients is of greatest importance. It is essential that the dental practitioners involved have some understanding of the anaesthetic implications of common medical conditions and are able to exclude patients with significant cardiac or respiratory disease, renal or hepatic impairment, bleeding disorders or a potentially difficult airway at the time of referral. Patients who do not meet these criteria should be referred to a specialist centre which has back-up facilities and should not be treated in a dental surgery.

Equipment

The minimum standards for monitoring during anaesthesia should be met (Table 38.17). Although most of the procedures in dental practice are short, it is very important that monitoring is used in each case. There is a high potential for airway obstruction resulting in hypoxaemia and also a relatively high incidence of cardiac arrhythmias especially when halothane is used. In practices where tracheal intubation is used, a capnograph is required. Table 54.1 List of emergency drugs to be available in dental practices

Dental anaesthesia

Anaesthesia and dentistry have a long historical association. Some of the first anaesthetics given were for dental extractions and the use of anaesthesia was quickly taken into dental practice in the late 19th century. Dental anaesthetic techniques have evolved in parallel with the changes in practice in other aspects of anaesthesia. The days of single operator anaesthetists and the 'black gas' induction (100 nitrous oxide) are now long gone. For many years, dental anaesthesia had been practised in a variety of sites varying from within dental schools to remote dental practices, with anaesthesia provided by anaesthetists, medical practitioners or indeed dentists. tistry by the Royal College of Anaesthetists (1999) have effectively concentrated the provision of anaesthesia for dental surgery to centralized facilities. Both reports stated that sedation should be used in preference to general anaesthesia wherever possible and made further recommendations on training in sedation...