Anal Fissure Clinical Summary

An anal fissure is a longitudinal tear of the skin of the anal canal and extends from the dentate line to the anal verge. Fissures are thought to be caused by the passage of hard or large stools with constipation, but may also be seen with diarrhea. The fissures are typically a few millimeters wide and occur in the posterior midline, but may occur elsewhere. An anal fissure that is off the midline may have a secondary cause, such as inflammatory bowel disease or sexually transmitted infection. Although often seen in infants, this condition is found mostly in young and middle-aged adults. Patients present with intense sharp, burning pain during and after bowel movements. They may see bright red blood at the time or shortly after the passage of stool. Gentle examination with separation of the buttocks usually provides good visualization. The diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis, or Crohn disease should be considered in the differential, particularly if the fissure is atypical. Anal fissures may result from Chlamydia , gonorrhea, herpes, and syphilis. Tuberculosis, anal neoplasms, and sickle cell disease can also present as an anal fissure.

Constipation Prescription

Constipation Prescription

Did you ever think feeling angry and irritable could be a symptom of constipation? A horrible fullness and pressing sharp pains against the bladders can’t help but affect your mood. Sometimes you just want everyone to leave you alone and sleep to escape the pain. It is virtually impossible to be constipated and keep a sunny disposition. Follow the steps in this guide to alleviate constipation and lead a happier healthy life.

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