Experiment

Figure 16.18 shows a modified Japanese female average face created from 12 faces after correcting for size differences. It was matched with the unmodified average face (Figure 16.19) created from the same faces but without correcting for size. The two average faces are shown together in Figure 16.20.

Figure 16.20 Modified Japanese female average from 12 faces after correcting for size (gray with red profile line) versus unmodified Japanese female average from the same 12 faces without correcting for size (pink with green profile line).

Figure 16.20 Modified Japanese female average from 12 faces after correcting for size (gray with red profile line) versus unmodified Japanese female average from the same 12 faces without correcting for size (pink with green profile line).

The matching value between the two averages was 1.00 mm. It can be inferred that correcting for size does not play a significant role in modifying the 3D morphology of the average face. It only corrects for the average outlines of the nose, mouth, and eyes. It is evident from Figures 16.18 and 16.19 that the facial features like the mouth, the nose, and the eyes are better and more cleanly outlined in the modified average when compared with those of the unmodified one. It is of interest that, in order to get such clean average outlines, more non-size-standardized faces are needed. When standardizing for size, averages are compared based on the shape factor as the size factor is excluded.

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