Burden of Disease

Of U.S. adults, 16% have a total cholesterol level greater than 240 mg/dL. Women have a higher prevalence of elevated total cholesterol than men (Schober et al., 2007). Low HDL is much more common in men than women (AHA, 2005). Total cholesterol levels higher than 200 mg/dL account for 27% of coronary heart disease (CHD) events in men and 34% in women. Elevated total cholesterol and low-density

Figure 6-2 Risk factors for cardiovascular disease. (From the National Heat, Blood, and Lung institute.http://hin.nhlbi.nih.gov/atpiii/calculator.asp?usertype=prof.)

Risk assessment tool for estimating 10-year risk of developing hard CHD (myocardial infarction and coronary death)

The risk assessment tool below uses recent data from the Framingham Heart Study to estimate 10-year risk for "hard" coronary heart disease outcomes (myocardial infarction and coronary death). This tool is designed to estimate risk in adults aged 20 and older who do not have heart disease or diabetes. Use the calculator below to estimate 10-year risk.

Age:

years Gender:

Total cholesterol: _ mg/dL

Smoker:

Systolic blood pressure: mm Hg

Currently on any medication to treat high blood pressure:

Calculate 10-year risk

Table 6-4 Adult Blood Pressure Classification System (JNC-7)

Blood Pressure Class

Blood Pressure (mm Hg)

Systolic

Diastolic

Normal

<120

and

<80

Prehypertension

120-139

or

80-89

Stage 1 hypertension

140-159

or

90-99

Stage 2 hypertension

>160

or

>100

Modified from Chobanian AV, Bakris GL, Black HR, et al. The Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure: the JNC-7 Report. JAMA 2003;289:2560-2572.

Modified from Chobanian AV, Bakris GL, Black HR, et al. The Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure: the JNC-7 Report. JAMA 2003;289:2560-2572.

lipoprotein (LDL) and low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) increase the risk of CHD linearly (Pignone et al., 2001).

Blood Pressure Health

Blood Pressure Health

Your heart pumps blood throughout your body using a network of tubing called arteries and capillaries which return the blood back to your heart via your veins. Blood pressure is the force of the blood pushing against the walls of your arteries as your heart beats.Learn more...

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