Flexor Digiti Minimi

FLEXOR DIGIT. MINIMI

Origin: Hook of the hamate bone and the flexor retinaculum.

Insertion: Base of the proximal phalanx of the little finger, ulnar side.

Action: Flexes the metacarpophalangeal joint of the little finger, and assists in opposition of the little finger toward the thumb.

Patient: Sitting or supine.

Fixation: The hand may rest on the table for support or be stabilized by the examiner.

Test: Flexion of the metacarpophalangeal joint, with the interphalangeal joints extended.

Pressure: Against the palmar surface of the proximal phalanx, in the direction of extension.

Weakness: Decreases the ability to flex the little finger and oppose it toward the thumb.

DORSAL INTEROSSEI

Origins:

First, lateral head: Proximal xh of the ulnar border of the first metacarpal bone.

First, medial head: Radial border of the second metacarpal bone.

Second, third, and fourth: Adjacent sides of the metacarpal bones in each interspace.

Insertions: Into extensor expansion and to the base of the proximal phalanx as follows:

First: Radial side of the index finger, chiefly to the base of the proximal phalanx.

Second: Radial side of the middle finger.

Third: Ulnar side of the middle finger, chiefly into extensor expansion.

Fourth: Ulnar side of the ring finger.

Action: Abducts the index, middle and ring fingers from the axial line through the third digit. Assists in flexion of the metacarpophalangeal joints and extension of the interphalangeal joints of the same fingers. The first assists in adduction of the thumb.

Patient: Sitting or supine.

Fixation: In general, stabilization of the adjacent digits to give fixation of the digit toward which the finger is moved and to prevent assistance from the digit on the other side.

Test and Pressure or Traction: Against the middle phalanx:

First: (Figure A) Abduction of the index finger toward the thumb. Apply pressure against the radial side of the index finger, in the direction of the middle finger.

Second: (Figure B) Abduction of the middle finger toward the index finger. Hold the middle finger, and pull in the direction of the ring finger.

Third: (Figure C) Abduction of the middle finger toward the ring finger. Hold the middle finger, and pull in the direction of the index finger.

Fourth: (Figure D) Abduction of the ring finger toward the little finger. Hold the ring finger, and pull in the direction of the middle finger.

Weakness: Decreases the ability to abduct the index, middle and ring fingers. Decreases the strength of extension of the interphalangeal joints and flexion of the metacarpophalangeal joints of the index, middle and ring fingers.

Shortness: Abduction of the index and ring fingers.

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