Introduction

• The energy transmitted to the hand that causes injuries in athletics is often relatively low; thus, the fracture patterns are generally simple and minimal soft-tissue injury is involved.

• The goal of treating hand fractures is to allow the athlete to participate in a safe fashion but to prevent the development of malunion, nonunion, joint stiffness, and tendon adhesions.

• Treatment is determined by the sport, position played, and timing of the injury in relationship to the season.

• The high demand on the upper extremity in sports makes the hand very susceptible to a variety of injuries.1

• Fractures of the metacarpals and phalanges frequently result in the loss of playing time and altered performance. Sports-related activities are the most common cause of phalangeal fractures in 10- to 49-year-olds.

• There are a variety of ways to treat fractures of the metacarpals and phalanges. In many cases, treatment can allow the athlete to return to competition safely and quickly.

Figure 41-1 Axial relationships of metacarpals illustrating that a lateral radiograph of the hand requires slight pronation and slight supination for independent visualization of index and small metacarpals. (From Hastings, Rettig, Strickland: Management of Extra-articular Fractures of the Phalanges and Metacarpals. Philadelphia, Elsevier, 1992.)

Figure 41-1 Axial relationships of metacarpals illustrating that a lateral radiograph of the hand requires slight pronation and slight supination for independent visualization of index and small metacarpals. (From Hastings, Rettig, Strickland: Management of Extra-articular Fractures of the Phalanges and Metacarpals. Philadelphia, Elsevier, 1992.)

radiographs and include at a minimum posteroanterior, lateral, and oblique views. It is important to know that a true lateral radiograph is a lateral view of the third metacarpal only and an oblique view of the other digits. The hand must be rolled into 30 degrees of supination to obtain a lateral view of the index metacarpal and 20 to 30 degrees of pronation to obtain a lateral view of the ring and small fingers (Fig. 41-1). A Brewerton view is helpful for evaluation of fractures at the base of the proximal phalanx.7

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Cure Tennis Elbow Without Surgery

Cure Tennis Elbow Without Surgery

Everything you wanted to know about. How To Cure Tennis Elbow. Are you an athlete who suffers from tennis elbow? Contrary to popular opinion, most people who suffer from tennis elbow do not even play tennis. They get this condition, which is a torn tendon in the elbow, from the strain of using the same motions with the arm, repeatedly. If you have tennis elbow, you understand how the pain can disrupt your day.

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