References

1. Maron BJ, Shirani J, Poliac LC, et al: Sudden death in young competitive athletes: Clinical, demographic and pathological profiles. JAMA 1996;276:199-204.

2. Maron BJ, Gohman TE, Aeppli D: Prevalence of sudden cardiac death during competitive sports activities in Minnesota high school athletes. J Am Coll Cardiol 1998;32:1881-1884.

3. Waller BF, Hawley DA, Clark MA, et al: Incidence of sudden deaths between 1985 and 1990 in Marion County, Indiana. Clin Cardiol 1992;15:851-858.

4. Thiene G, Basso C, Corrado D: Is prevention of sudden death in young athletes feasible? Cardiologia 1999;44:497-505.

5. Huston TP, Puffer JC, Rodney WM: The athletic heart syndrome. N Engl J Med 1985;313:24-32.

6. Deutsch E, Kauf E: Heart and Athletics [Warfield LM, trans.]. St. Louis, CV Mosby, 1927, pp 17-103.

7. Morganroth J, Maron BJ, Henry WL, et al: Comparative left ventricular dimensions in trained athletes. Ann Intern Med 1975;82:521-524.

8. Pelliccia A, Maron BJ, Culasso F, et al: The upper limit of physiologic cardiac hypertrophy in highly trained elite athletes. N Engl J Med 1991;324:295-301.

9. Watkins H, Rosenzweig A, Hwang D-S, et al: Characteristics and prognostic implications of myosin missense mutations in familial hyper-trophic cardiomyopathy. N Engl J Med 1992;326:1108-1114.

10. Watkins H, McKenna WJ, Thierfelder L, et al: Mutations in the genes for cardiac troponin T and alpha-tropomyosin in hypertrophic car-diomyopathy. N Engl J Med 1995;332:1058-1064.

11. Davis JA, Cecchin F, Jones TK, et al: Major coronary artery anomalies in a pediatric population: Incidence and clinical importance. J Am Coll

Cardiol 2001;37:593-597.

12. Basso C, Maron BJ, Corrado D, et al: Clinical profile of congenital coronary artery anomalies with origin from the wrong aortic sinus leading to sudden death in young competitive athletes. J Am Coll Cardiol 2000;35:1493-1501.

13. Zeppilli P, dello Russo A, Santini C, et al: In vivo detection of coronary artery anomalies in asymptomatic athletes by echocardiographic screening. Chest 1998;114:89-93.

14. Maron BJ, Thompson PD, Puffer JC, et al: Cardiovascular screening of competitive athletes: A statement for health professionals from the sudden death committee (clinical cardiology) and congenital cardiac defects committee (cardiovascular disease in the young), American Heart Association. Circulation 1996;94:850-856.

15. Glover DW Maron BJ: Profile of preparticipation cardiovascular screening for high school athletes. JAMA 1998;279:1817-1819.

16. Pfister GC, Puffer JC, Maron BJ: Preparticipation cardiovascular screening for US collegiate student-athletes. JAMA 2000;283:1597-1599.

17. International Olympic Committee Medical Commission: Sudden cardiovascular death in sport: Lausanne recommendations, 2004.

18. Study Group of Sport Cardiology of the Working Group of Cardiac Rehabilitation and Exercise Physiology and the Working Group of Myocardial and Pericardial Diseases of the European Society of Cardiology: Cardiovascular preparticipation screening of young competitive athletes for prevention of sudden death: Proposals for a common European protocol. Eur Heart J 2005;26:516-524.

19. Corrado D, Basso C, Sachiavon M, et al: Screening for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in young athletes. N Engl J Med 1998;339:364-369.

20. Fuller CM, McNulty CM, Spring A, et al: Prospective screening of 5615 high school athletes for risk of sudden cardiac death. Med Sci Sports Exerc 1997;29:1131-1138.

21. Feinstein RA, Colvin E, Oh MK: Echocardiographic screening as a part of a preparticipation examination. Clin J Sports Med 1993;3:149— 152.

22. Weidenbener EJ, Krauss BF, Waller BF, et al: Incorporation of screening echocardiography in the preparticipation exam. Clin J Sports Med 1995;5:86-89.

23. Fuller CM: Cost effectiveness analysis of screening of high school athletes for risk of sudden cardiac death. Med Sci Sports Exerc 2000;32:887-890.

CHAPTER

55

M E

dedications, Supplements, and xgogenic Drugs

George C. Phillips

In This Chapter

Hypertension Hypercholesterolemia Exercise-induced asthma Psychiatric medications Pain relievers/osteoarthritis Supplements Anabolic steroids Other ergogenic drugs sport performance as well. Direct marketing of various over-the-counter and prescription medications to the general public also brings a unique pressure to bear on the physician caring for athletes at all skill levels. The recent emphasis on lifelong physical activity for prevention and management of various conditions, such as hypertension and obesity, has expanded the population served by the field of sports medicine as well. This section reviews several different medications that may be used by recreational and elite athletes for one or more of the reasons previously stated and is organized by the condition treated.

Was this article helpful?

0 0
Cure Tennis Elbow Without Surgery

Cure Tennis Elbow Without Surgery

Everything you wanted to know about. How To Cure Tennis Elbow. Are you an athlete who suffers from tennis elbow? Contrary to popular opinion, most people who suffer from tennis elbow do not even play tennis. They get this condition, which is a torn tendon in the elbow, from the strain of using the same motions with the arm, repeatedly. If you have tennis elbow, you understand how the pain can disrupt your day.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment