References

1. Fu FH, Stone DA: Sports Injuries: Mechanisms, Prevention and Treatment. Baltimore, Williams & Wilkins, 1994.

2. Crisco JJ, Jokl P, Heinen GT, et al: A muscle contusion injury model: Biomechanics, physiology and histology. Am J Sports Med 1994;22:702-710.

3. Jackson DW Feagin JA: Quadriceps contusions in young athletes: Relation of severity of injury to treatment and prognosis. J Bone Joint Surg Am 1973;55:95-105.

4. Noonan TJ, Garrett WE: Muscle strain injury: Diagnosis and treatment. J Am Acad Orthop Surg 1999;7:262-269.

symptoms are limited to tenderness or slight swelling in that area. Cysts around the joint may also be symptomatic.

Peroneal nerve irritation just posterior to the fibular head may be evaluated using Tinel's test. Testing the anterior and lateral muscles by resisted dorsiflexion and eversion of the foot will stress the tibial-fibular joint and sometimes elicit symptoms, including pain and popping or shifting in that area. Plain radiographs, fluoroscopy, computed tomography scan, and MRI may be useful, but are frequently normal. A diagnostic/therapeutic injection of local anesthetic and corticosteroid can also be used. Treatment is generally conservative, but surgical stabilization has been described in recalcitrant cases, when instability of the joint is present.

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Cure Tennis Elbow Without Surgery

Cure Tennis Elbow Without Surgery

Everything you wanted to know about. How To Cure Tennis Elbow. Are you an athlete who suffers from tennis elbow? Contrary to popular opinion, most people who suffer from tennis elbow do not even play tennis. They get this condition, which is a torn tendon in the elbow, from the strain of using the same motions with the arm, repeatedly. If you have tennis elbow, you understand how the pain can disrupt your day.

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